Tuesday, December 09, 2008

Dennnis Yost - Classics IV - R.I.P.

By LISA CORNWELL

CINCINNATI (AP) — Dennis Yost, lead singer of the 1960s group the Classics IV, has died in an Ohio hospital. He was 65.

Yost died Sunday at Fort Hamilton Hospital in Hamilton, about 30 miles northwest of Cincinnati. He died of respiratory failure, hospital spokeswoman Marielou Vierling said.

The Classics IV's hits included "Spooky," "Stormy" and "Traces of Love."

Yost had been in nursing homes since suffering a brain injury sustained in a 2005 fall, said Joe Glickman, the singer's friend and biographer .

"I'm still in shock because he was fine Saturday morning," said his wife, Linda Yost, of suburban Hamilton. "And by, you know, early Sunday morning he was gone."

The Classics IV got their start in Jacksonville, Fla., where Yost, a native of Detroit, was raised, Glickman said. Their hit recordings were produced in Atlanta under the supervision of producer Buddy Buie and Bill Lowery, founder of Lowery Music Inc.

The group performed together for about five years.

Buie, who was a co-writer of the group's songs with the group's guitarist, J.R. Cobb, said: "Dennis had an incredible voice — just a great voice for love songs."

The 67-year-old Buie, who's retired and living in Eufaula, Ala., added: "I am deeply saddened by his passing."

Cobb, 65, said he and Yost grew up in Jacksonville and rode motorcycles together before they were in the band. Cobb, who later performed with the Atlanta Rhythm Section and with the Highwaymen — a country group that included Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Kris Kristofferson and Willie Nelson — is retired and lives in Monticello, Ga.

"Dennis was a friend as well as a fellow musician," said Cobb. "I always thought he had a very distinctive voice, and I think we had some of the hits we had because of him and his ability as a singer."

Jon "Bowzer" Bauman, a vocalist with the former rock and comedy group Sha Na Na, held a benefit concert last year to help with Yost's increasing medical costs, Glickman said.

"He was a tremendous talent who did an enormous amount of the work for that group," said Bauman, who works against copycat performers as chairman of Truth in Music, based at the Vocal Group Hall of Fame Foundation in Sharon, Pa.

"Paradoxically, I came to know Dennis better in the later years, in which he was involved in a massive struggle to retain his own musical identity, which was one of the saddest and most difficult cases of someone losing the name of their own group, when he had pretty much been the group," Bauman said.

Bauman said truth in music legislation has been adopted in 26 states, and a bill was expected to make it through the legislature and to the governor's desk next week in Yost's home state of Ohio.

Yost is survived by his wife and five children. A memorial service is planned for this weekend, Linda Yost said.

Monday, December 08, 2008

Brenda Lee - Voice Your Choice

Brenda Lee, "Little Miss Dynamite", began her professional singing career at age six. She was born Brenda Mae Tarpley on December 11, 1944 in Lithonia, Georgia. When she was just twelve years old, she signed with Decca Records in 1956. Between 1957 and 1973, she had 55 songs on the Billboard Hot 100 charts. She became the #1 female singer of the 1960s.

This week on Treasure Island Oldies, Voice Your Choice presents Brenda Lee with two of her well known and loved ballads for your votes: Emotions and Break It To Me Gently.

Cast your vote for the song you'd like to hear by making your selection at the Voice Your Choice page. We'll play the winner in Hour 3 of next week's show.

Paul Evans - Song of the Week

Paul Evans, a good friend of Treasure Island Oldies, sent along a great Christmas tune that I would like to share with you this week. It's called Santa's Stuck Up In The Chimney, our Song of the Week.
Enjoy!
Michael

Monday, December 01, 2008

Roy Orbison - Voice Your Choice

Roy Orbison was born April 23, 1936 in Vernon, Texas and dies of a heart attack at age 52 on December 6, 1988. He first hit the charts back in 1956 with Ooby Dooby, billed on the label as Roy Orbison and Teen Kings. Overall, he appeared on the Billboard charts thirty-two times and had ten Top Ten hits and a Gold Record for Oh, Pretty Woman.

This week on Treasure Island Oldies, Voice Your Choice spotlights the late Roy Orbison with two of his well-loved songs for your votes: Blue Angel and It's Over.

Cast you vote at the Voice Your Choice page and make your selection. We'll play the winner in Hour 3 of next week's show.

Monday, November 24, 2008

Delfonics - Voice Your Choice

The Delfonics, an R&B vocal group, were from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The members were brothers William and Wilbert Hart, Ritchie Daniels, and Randy Cain.

Between 1968 and 1973 they appeared on the Billboard Hot 100 Charts sixteen times. They reached the Top Ten twice and also received a Gold Record.

This week on Treasure Island Oldies, Voice Your Choice spotlights The Delfonics with two of their signature songs, La-La-Means I Love You and Didn't I (Blow Your Mind This Time). Cast your vote by clicking here and casting your vote at the Voice Your Choice page. We'll play the winning song in the 3rd hour of next week's show.

Skylark - Song of the Week

Skylark, a great pop group from Vancouver, BC, the home of Treasure Island Oldies, had quite the lineup. David Foster (yes, that's him in the middle of the photo), BJ Cook, Carl Graves, Duris Maxwell, and lead vocalist Donny Gerard. They scored a massive hit with Wildflower in 1973. Here they are performing Wildflower live, Skylark with our Song of the Week.
Enjoy!
Michael

Monday, November 17, 2008

The Dramatics - Voice Your Choice

The Dramatics, an R&B vocal group from Detroit, Michigan, are in the Voice Your Choice spotlight this week on Treasure Island Oldies. The five original members were Ron Banks, William Howard, Larry Demps, Willie Ford and Elbert Wilkins. L.J. Reynolds and Lenny Mayes replaced Howard and Wilkins in 1973, and the group continued on with success.

They had an astounding 36 charted singles on the R&B charts between 1967 and 1996; and they appeared on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on twelve occasions between 1971 and 1977.

On Voice Your Choice this week, we present two of the signature songs by The Dramatics for your votes: Whatcha See Is Whatcha Get and In The Rain. Come to the Voice Your Choice page and cast your vote. We'll play the winning hit in Hour 3 of next week's show.

Bill Haley And His Comets - Song of the Week

In conjunction with our Fabulous '50s Special this week on Treasure Island Oldies, our Song of the Week is a great clip of Bill Haley And His Comets performing Rock Around The Clock live.
Enjoy!
Michael

Click here to go to the Archive page at the website to hear the entire four hour special.

Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Jody Reynolds - Song of the Week

As a tribute to Jody Reynolds who passed away November 7 (see the posting below), our Song of the Week is Endless Sleep, the first death/tragedy song of the Rock and Roll Era.

Enjoy!
Michael

Jody Reynolds - R.I.P.

Jody Reynolds, who recorded one of the all time classic songs of the rock & roll era for Demon Records, 'Endless Sleep', passed away on November 7 in Palm Springs, CA. He was 75.

'Endless Sleep' was recorded at the legendary Goldstar recording studio in Hollywood in 1958, with Al Casey picking those unforgettable ominous sounding deep guitar chords which punctuate the song. He was accompanied on the classic by ex-Nat King Cole guitarist, Irving Ashby, as well as jazz great Howard Roberts, with Raymond Martinez on drums.

Jody wrote the song in 1956, although 2 years passed before he got it into the recording studio. The record sold a million for Jody and became an international hit. The follow-up, 'Fire Of Love' also charted, but somehow it just lacked that special something which made 'Endless Sleep' such anunforgettable record and also one of the earliest death songs.

Monday, November 10, 2008

Miriam Makeba - Music Legend - Has Died At Age 76


Sad news reported by Daily Nation...
Miriam Makeba, one of Africa’s greatest music legends and South Africa liberation heroine died on Monday in Italy where she was suddenly taken ill after a concert.

Wire reports have quoted a hospital in southern Italy saying the 76-year-old musician died early Monday.

Italy's ANSA news agency reports that Makeba was stricken with an apparent heart attack just after she sang at a concert for an Italian journalist threatened by the Naples-area Mafia.

In South Africa, her publicist broke the news to a local radio station on Monday. Talk Radio 702 said Makeba died of a heart attack shortly after performing at an event in the southern town of Caserta.

"I'm not yet absolutely certain of the causes of her passing, but she has had arthritis, severe arthritis, for some time," her publicist told the station.

Nicknamed Mama Africa by her fans, Makeba was born on March 4, 1932, in a shantytown outside Johannesburg. She was the first black South African singer to gain international fame and was also hailed as an anti-apartheid icon.

She was the the first black African woman to receive a Grammy Award in 1965, which she shared with Harry Belafonte.

The concert where she had just performed was in support of writer Roberto Saviano, who wrote "Gomorra", a book about organised crime in southern Italy.

She may be best remembered for the distinctive clicking sounds which punctuate songs in her native Xhosa language.

Saturday, November 08, 2008

R.I.P. Jamaican Music Legend Byron Lee



Bandleader, producer, studio owner, and Jamaican musical icon Byron Lee passed away November 4 after a battle with cancer, according to a post on his website. He was 73. Lee formed his famed band the Dragonaires in 1957 and kept the group going in one form or another for the next five decades to come. During the 1960s and 70s, he helped bring the sound of Jamaica -- including ska, rock steady, reggae, and soca music -- to a much wider audience both at home and abroad, though such hits as "Jamaica Ska", "Tiney Winey" and "Dancehall Soca", as well as his work as a producer and studio head. Lee and the Dragonaires appeared in the very first James Bond
film, 1962's Dr. No and Lee, along with several other Jamaican luminaries, were sent to showcase the unique sound of the island's music at New York's 1964-65 World's Fair. Lee insisted on a certain dapper look and reasonable behavior from his Dragonaires bandmates, and would later boast that "I am pleased to say that in all my years of touring we have never had any incident involving a member of my band whilst on tour." In addition to his own musical endeavors, Lee was also a serious businessman. In 1965, Lee created Lee Enterprises, which went on to produce hit
shows in Jamaica for the likes of James Brown, Al Green, the Drifters, and others. In 1968, he bought West Indies Records, renamed it Dynamic Studios and set up one of the island's most well-appointed studios, recording artists such as the Rolling
Stones, David Bowie, Paul Simon, and Bob Marley. Dynamic Sounds was also involved with distributing foreign records to North American and European audiences. In 1990, Lee launched the annual Byron Lee Jamaica Carnival in Kingston, which went on to become one of the nation's largest music events. He and the Dragonaires performed and recorded up until the very end; indeed, they were scheduled to play in Sunrise,
Florida this coming Sunday, according to the Miami Herald. On Tuesday, Jamaica's current Prime Minister Bruce Golding said of Lee's passing, "Jamaica, and
indeed the world, has lost another great music pioneer with the passing this morning of Byron Lee, one of the greatest band leaders ever to grace the entertainment stages of the world".

Thursday, November 06, 2008

Post A Poppy for Remembrance Day and Memorial Day


In honour of and out of respect for everyone who has sacrificed their lives for our freedom, on November 11th I urge you to wear a poppy and post one on your website. It is the least we can do to recognize all that they have done for us.

Michael

In Flanders Fields

by John McCrae, May 1915

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep,
though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Spanky And Our Gang - Voice Your Choice


Spanky And Our Gang were a folk-pop group from Chicago that took their name from the Little Rascals series of movies, serials and TV shows. Elaine "Spanky" McFarlane was the lead singer with the other members made up of Malcolm Hale, Lefty Baker, Nigel Pickering, Kenny Hodges and John Seiter. Sadly Malcolm Hale and Lefty Baker both died of liver failure in 1968 and 1971 respectively.

In two short years they charted nine singles and achieved one Top Ten hit.

This week on Treasure Island Oldies, Voice Your Choice spotlights Spanky And Our Gang with two of their most loved hit songs: Sunday Will Never Be The Same and Lazy Day. Cast you vote for the song you'd like to hear by coming to the Voice Your Choice page and making your selection. We'll play the winner in Hour 3 of next week's show.

We Five - Song Of The Week


Our Song of the Week is by We Five from San Francisco. They recorded a cover version of a song originally recorded by Canada's Ian & Sylvia and written by Sylvia Fricker. Here is a clip of You Were On My Mind.

Enjoy!
Michael

Sunday, October 26, 2008

Monday, October 20, 2008

The 12th Annual Halloween Spooktacular


Just a reminder to be sure to come "hang out" with Count Michael for the 12th Annual Halloween Spooktacular on Treasure Island Oldies, live (or should that be dead!) at 6 pm Pacific, 9 pm Eastern Sunday, October 26th. Just don't listen with the lights out! You'll be sorry. ha ha ha ha ha ha

Four Tops - Song Of The Week


In honour of the late great Levi Stubbs, who passed away Friday, October 14th, I am pleased to present for you as our Song of the Week, the Debut Single by The Four Tops, Baby I Need Your Lovin'.

Enjoy!
Michael

Saturday, October 18, 2008

British Singer Russ Hamilton Has Died At Age 76


Long before the Beatles put Liverpool on the map with American record buyers, Liverpudlian Russ Hamilton reached the U.S. top ten with "Rainbow". Russ died Saturday (October 11) in Buckley, North Wales at the age of 76.

Born Ronnie Hulme in Liverpool in 1932, he got his start singing at a holiday camp in Clacton-on-Sea and earned a recording contract with Oriole Records in 1957. The A-side, "We Will Make Love", reached #2 in England and earned him a gold record, while the B-side was his only American hit, getting to #4 (on the Kapp label). Though he recorded sixteen follow-ups over the next seven years, his only other British hit was "Wedding Ring" (#20-1957).

Having become disillusioned with the music industry, Russ retired to Wales at that point, though he toured briefly in 1967 and even sang "We Will Make Love" at a performance of "Grease" in 1986. He complained once that he never even got his gold record.

Friday, October 17, 2008

Levi Stubbs - The Voice Of The Four Tops - Dead At 72


DETROIT, Michigan (AP) -- Four Tops lead singer Levi Stubbs, who possessed one of the most dynamic and emotive voices of all the Motown singers, died Friday at 72.

He had been ill recently and died in his sleep at the Detroit house he shared with his wife, said Dana Meah, the wife of a grandson.

The Wayne County medical examiner's office also confirmed the death.

With Stubbs in the lead, the Four Tops sold millions of records, including such hits as "Baby I Need Your Loving," "Reach Out (I'll Be There)" and "I Can't Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch)."

The group performed for more than four decades without a change in personnel. Stubbs' death leaves one surviving member of the original group: Abdul "Duke" Fakir.

Stubbs "fits right up there with all the icons of Motown," said Audley Smith, chief operating officer of the Motown Historical Museum. "His voice was as unique as Marvin's or as Smokey's or as Stevie's."

The Four Tops began singing together in 1953 under the group name the Four Aims and signed a deal with Chess Records. They later changed their names to the Four Tops to avoid being confused with the Ames Brothers.

They also recorded for Red Top, Riverside and Columbia Records and toured supper clubs.

The Four Tops signed with Motown Records in 1963 and produced 20 Top-40 hits over the next 10 years, making music history with the other acts in Berry Gordy's Motown stable.

Their biggest hits were recorded between 1964 and 1967 with the in-house songwriting and production team of Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Eddie Holland. Both 1965's "I Can't Help Myself" and 1966's "Reach Out" went to No. 1 on the Billboard pop chart.

Other hits included "Shake Me, Wake Me" (1966); "Bernadette" and "Standing in the Shadows of Love" (both 1967).

They toured for decades afterward and reached the charts as late as 1988 with "Indestructible" on Arista Records. In 1986, Stubbs provided the voice for Audrey II the man-eating plant in the film "Little Shop of Horrors."

The group was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990 and has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Original Top Lawrence Payton died of liver cancer in 1997. Renaldo "Obie" Benson died of lung cancer in 2005.

Stubbs was born in 1936 in Detroit and attended Pershing High School, where he sang with Fakir. They met fellow Detroiters Payton and Benson while singing at a mutual friend's birthday party, then decided to form a group.

"These are four of the greatest people I have ever known. They were major pros even before they came to Motown," Gordy said when the Four Tops' star was unveiled in Hollywood.

Stubbs is survived by his wife, five children and 11 grandchildren.

Thursday, October 16, 2008

Neil Hefti - Batman Composer - Dead At Age 85


by The Associated Press
October 15, 2008

Los Angeles -- Neal Hefti, a Big Band trumpeter, arranger and composer of themes for the movie ''The Odd Couple'' and the ''Batman'' television series, has died. He was 85. Hefti died Saturday at his home, said his son Paul Hefti. Neal Hefti's notable
achievements include the iconic theme of the 1960s superhero series ''Batman,'' which became a Top 40 hit and won a Grammy Award in 1966 for best instrumental theme. He also composed music for ''The Odd Couple,'' ''Barefoot in the Park'' and ''Harlow,'' which featured his classic track ''Girl Talk.'' His son said the ''Batman'' theme was Neal Hefti's most difficult piece, taking him at least one month to compose the driving bass and explosive trumpet bursts. ''He threw away more music paper on this thing than any other song,'' Paul Hefti told The Associated Press. ''It got down to the blues with a funny guitar hook, the lowest common denominator and a fun groove.'' Neal Hefti was born Oct. 29, 1922, in Hastings, Neb., and played trumpet with local bands as a teenager to earn money. As an adult, he worked with and arranged music for the greats of the Big Band era, including Count Basie, Woody Herman, Charlie Spivak and Harry James. ''He was one of the
really great arrangers and composers of all time,'' radio and television personality Gary Owens, a longtime friend, told the Los Angeles Times.

Monday, October 13, 2008

Jefferson Airplane - Voice Your Choice


San Francisco, California was the home to Jefferson Airplane, who rose to fame during 1967, the Summer of Love. The members were Marty Balin, Grace Slick, Paul Kantner, Jorma Kaukonen, Jack Cassidy, and Spencer Dryden. Over the years, their name changed to Jefferson Starship and finally to Starship.

To some it may be a surprise that they appeared on the Billboard Hot 100 charts 38 times between 1967 and 1991.

This week on Voice Your choice we go back to their beginnings with two of their first hits, both Top Ten hits: Somebody To Love and White Rabbit. Incidentally, Somebody To Love was originally released by the Great Society in 1966 under the title Someone To Love. If you have a copy of this 45 on North Beach Records, it is worth $300 to you!

Cast your vote for either Somebody To Love or White Rabbit by coming to the Voice Your Choice page. We'll play the winner in Hour 3 of next week's show.

Conway Twitty - Song Of The Week


Now here is a classic hit song by Conway Twitty. This song was written by Conway in a hotel room in Hamilton, Ontario, while he was on tour. It's Only Make Believe is our Song of the Week.

Enjoy!
Michael

Monday, October 06, 2008

George Harrison - Voice Your Choice


At times overshadowed by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, George Harrison was no slouch in the talent department, as both a musician and a songwriter. He was born February 24, 1943 in Wavertree, Liverpool, England and sadly, he died of cancer on November 29, 2001. He formed his own group known as The Rebels when he was only 13 years old. In 1958, he joined Paul McCartney and John Lennon in The Quarrymen, later evolving into The Beatles, with George as their lead guitarist.

In the post-Beatles years, George appeared 17 times on the Billboard chart as a solo artist. His "debut" was My Sweet Lord, which remained at #1 for four weeks and became a Gold Record.

This week on Treasure Island Oldies, Voice Your Choice features George Harrison with two of his beloved and thought provoking songs: What Is Life and Give Me Love (Give Me Peace On Earth.

Cast your vote for the song you'd like to hear by coming to the Voice Your Choice page and casting your vote. We'll play the winning song in Hour 3 of next week's show.

Johnny Rivers - Song of the Week


Our Song of the Week is by Johnny Rivers with his version of the classic Mountain Of Love. Enjoy!
Michael

Saturday, October 04, 2008

The Edsels' George Jones Dead At 75


This sad news in from Oldies Music.com

George Jones, lead singer of the Edsels and writer of their hit, "Rama Lama Ding Dong", died Saturday (September 27) in Youngstown, Ohio at the age of 71. No cause of death was given but George had suffered from cancer. He was born in Richmond, Virginia in 1936 and his family moved to Youngstown so his father could work in the steel mill there. Though he originally sang doo wop with other students at Campbell Memorial High School, it was in the Air Force that George wrote the classic "Rama Lama Ding Dong", which he didn't think would be a hit. Upon his return in 1957 though, the group recorded the tune, calling themselves the Essos (after the chain of gas stations). That was quickly changed to Edsels when Ford introduced their lavish new car. The song appeared in 1958 on tiny Dub Records out of Little Rock as "Lama Rama Ding Dong". The song went nowhere (much like the Edsel car), as did two follow-ups on two other labels, though the group did appear on "American Bandstand". It was the success of "Blue Moon" by the Marcels in 1961 however, that convinced a New York disk Jockey to start playing the similar-sounding song. That led to the song being leased by Old Town Records, who re-released it on their Twin label. With its title corrected, the song made #21 nationally, no doubt hindered by the release of an alternate take by Dub. In fact, though the Edsels then signed with Capitol Records, they had to compete with older recordings from Dub which were leased to Dot Records and never charted again on any label. The Edsels broke up in 1963 and in later years George managed several gospel groups, including one made up of his family members.

Friday, October 03, 2008

Kingston Trio Founder Nick Reynolds Dead At 75


The founder of The Kingston Trio, Nick Reynolds has died at age 75. Here is the full story.

by The Associated Press
October 2, 2008

San Diego -- Nick Reynolds, a founding member of the Kingston Trio who jump-started the revival folk scene of the late 1950s and paved the way for artists such as Bob Dylan and Joan Baez, has died. He was 75. Reynolds had been hospitalized with acute
respiratory disease and other illnesses, and died Wednesday in San Diego after his family took him off life support, said son Joshua Reynolds. ''Dad was so happy he turned people onto music in a way that people could really approach it, in a simple and honest way,'' Josh Reynolds told The Associated Press. ''He was a very gracious and loving performer. He was a devoted family man.'' The Kingston Trio's
version of the 19th century folk song ''Tom Dooley'' landed the group a No. 1 spot on the charts in 1958, and launched the band's career.

Born on July 27, 1933, in San Diego, Nicholas Reynolds demonstrated an early love of music and did sing-alongs with his two sisters and their Navy captain-father, who taught him to play guitar. He graduated from Coronado High School in 1951 and
attended the University of Arizona and San Diego State University before attending Menlo College, a business school near Palo Alto. He graduated from Menlo in 1956. It was during the mid-1950s that Nicholas Reynolds met Bob Shane, who introduced him
to Stanford student Dave Guard. Guard and Shane knew each other from playing music in Guard's native Hawaii. The three formed the Kingston Trio. In 1958, ''Tom Dooley'' earned Reynolds, Guard and Shane a trophy for best country and western performance at the first Grammys. The group, defined by tight harmonies and a clean-cut style, went on to win a Grammy the next year for best folk performance for
its album ''The Kingston Trio At Large.'' Later member John Stewart joined the group in 1961, replacing Guard. Stewart died in January, also in San Diego. After leaving the Kingston Trio in 1967, Reynolds moved to Oregon, where he stayed until the
1980s and took a break from music to raise his family, his son said. Reynolds moved back to California in the mid-1980s and rejoined Stewart for one album. In 1991, Reynolds rejoined Shane in a reconstituted version of the Trio. He remained with
the group until retiring in 2003, his son said.

Reynolds is survived by his wife Leslie, sons Joshua and John Pike Reynolds, daughters Annie Reynolds Moore and Jennifer Reynolds, and his two sisters.

Monday, September 29, 2008

Gerry And The Pacemakers - Voice Your Choice


Gerry and the Pacemakers were a pop-rock Merseybeat band from Liverpool. Apart from group leader Gerry Marsden on vocals, the Pacemakers were Leslie Maguire (piano), John Chadwick (bass), and brother Freddie Marsden (drums).

In late 1962, Gerry and the Pacemakers were the second band to be signed up by Brian Epstein - the Beatles were the first. When the Beatles rejected Mitch Murray's light-hearted "How Do You Do It", Epstein told the record producer George Martin that he had just the group to do it. On 22 January 1963, Gerry and the Pacemakers travelled from Liverpool to London to record the song, as Marsden recalled:

We were sat in the back of a freezing van for 10 hours in the worst weather you can imagine. The road manager slept through it all because he was shattered. We knew that the Beatles had turned down "How Do You Do It" and I thought they were silly to do that, as it was a much better song than "Love Me Do".

The single went to No l, as did its cheeky follow-up, "I Like It". Having seen Paul McCartney's success around the Liverpool clubs with "Over the Rainbow", Gerry and the Pacemakers wanted a similar, emotional show-stopper and they picked "You'll Never Walk Alone" from the 1945 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Carousel. With George Martin's arrangement, they became the first UK beat group to record with strings. They also became the first act to reach No l with their first three singles. "You'll Never Walk Alone" was subsequently adopted by Liverpool football club and became the Kop anthem.

After the three No 1 hits for Gerry and the Pacemakers in 1963, their fourth single, Gerry's own song "I'm the One", went to No 2 the following year. Freddie felt that they would have had a fourth chart-topper if they had picked their stage favourite, "Pretend". Freddie co-wrote "Don't Let The Sun Catch You Cryin'", which became their biggest US hit, reaching No 4 in 1964. He was immensely proud when José Feliciano recorded the song. Freddie Marsden also co-wrote "Why Oh Why" and "You've Got What I Like", and sang the occasional vocal, joining Gerry on harmony for "A Shot of Rhythm and Blues".

The group were featured on scooters for the film Ferry Cross The Mersey (1965), which was written by the creator of Coronation Street, Tony Warren. Although the plot is trite, the film offers invaluable views of Merseyside sights and clubs of the Sixties. The title song, written by Gerry Marsden, charted for the group in 1965. "There were lots of songs about Chicago, Broadway and London," said Freddie, "but nobody had mentioned Liverpool until then."

This week on Treasure Island Oldies, Voice Your Choice presents Gerry And The Pacemakers with two of their big hit ballads: Don't Let The Sun Catch You Crying and Ferry Cross The Mersey.

Which song would you like me to play? Come to the Voice Your Choice page at Treasure Island Oldies and cast your vote. We'll play the winner in Hour 3 of next week's show.

The Byrds - Song Of The Week


The Byrds, James McGuinn (he legally changed his name to Roger McGuinn in 1968), David Crosby, Gene Clark, Chris Hillman, and Mike Clarke, were formed in Los Angeles.

Their first hit single was written by Bob Dylan. When they recorded Mr. Tambourine Man, Roger McGuinn was the only member of the group considered good enough to play on the recording date, so session players were called in to lay down the tracks. Those session players eventually became known as The Wrecking Crew.

In celebration of seeing the documentary movie, The Wrecking Crew, at the Vancouver International Film Festival, almost every song on this week's show is performed by The Wrecking Crew, either as backup musicians for other recording artists such as Nancy Sinatra, Fifth Dimension, The Monkees, The Beach Boys, Sonny and Cher, and so many more; or songs they recorded on their own as a group of featured players, but given different names for each release, such as The Marketts, The T-Bones, etc., but not The Wrecking Crew.

Here is a rare clip of The Byrds performing, err that is, lip synching Mr. Tambourine Man, our Song of the Week.

For more, visit The Wrecking Crew movie website.

Enjoy!
Michael

Saturday, September 27, 2008

The Wrecking Crew - A Must See Film



Got to finally see The Wrecking Crew last night as part of the Vancouver International Film Festival. I went in with no expectations and was both greatly entertained and informed. The film is not just a history lesson about who played on what song, but delves into the personalities of the various musicians of The Wrecking Crew, including Hal Blaine, Carol Kaye, Tommy Tedesco, Glen Campbell, Earl Palmer, Plas Johnson, Al Casey, Joe Osborn, and many others. It is pointed out that there were many musicians involved, in the range of between 20 to 30, but the focus is on the main core.

The film brings a wonderful perspective of its director, Denny Tedesco, who is the son of the legendary guitarist Tommy Tedesco. He grew up with his dad as a musician, who left in the morning to go to work, but was not really aware of the significant role his father was playing in the music industry. He only got to know the other players during the making of this documentary.

The Wrecking Crew is playing the festival circuit internationally, and I highly recommend that you go to the website and check to see if it will be playing anywhere near you. From music fans to industry pros, this is a must see movie documenting a key period in pop and social culture of the late 50s and 60s. I loved it! I would also love to see the soundtrack released in a box set, complete with ALL the accurate credits for the musicians who played on so many hit songs of The Righteous Brothers, Frank Sinatra, The Beach Boys, The Association, Gary Lewis & The Playboys, The Monkees, and so many more. What a historical music document that would make! It would also finally set the record straight.

I was also really pleased to connect with Denny Tedesco. Denny got in touch with me prior to coming to Vancouver to do media publicity interviews for the movie and the film festival and we arranged to get together. Over appetizers and drinks after the screening, we had a great time talking about the making of the movie and the long and at times, difficult path it took to actually get the movie made. He told me there will be lots more when the movie is released on DVD, a bonus disc with more interviews than time allowed for in the movie. Can't wait.

My hats off and much appreciation to Denny Tedesco for making this film, and as a result of getting together after the show, I've made a new friend.

And be sure to visit The Wrecking Crew for much more information on the movie, the musicians and the songs.

Icon Paul Newman Dead at Age 83


Screen legend Paul Newman has died at the age of 83 after losing his battle against cancer.

A spokesman for the actor, Marni Tomljanovic, said Newman died on Friday.

Newman initially tried to play down concerns about his health after reports that he was undergoing cancer treatment in New York.

But AE Hotchner, who helped create the successful Newman's Own food company in 1982, confirmed in June that the actor had been ill for 18 months. "It's a form of cancer, and he's dealing with it. Paul is a fighter," Hotchner told the Associated Press.

All proceeds from Newman's Own salad dressings and snacks go to charity, and the actor has become a leading advocate for corporate philanthropy. Fox news reported this week that Newman gave away $120m during 2005 and 2006.

Newman is best known for his leading roles in The Hustler, Cool Hand Luke and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, in which he played opposite longtime friend Robert Redford.

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

The Fleetwoods - Voice Your Choice


The Fleetwoods were a pop vocal trio from Olympia, Washington and were the only pop group from the Rock and Roll era to have two Number One hits in the same year, 1959. The trio consisted of founder Gretchen Christopher, Barbara Ellis and Gary Troxel. They were considered by many to be ahead of their time with their intimate harmonies, intricate counterpoint and vocal arrangements.

Between 1959 and 1963 they charted 11 hits on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, including three Top Ten and two Gold Records.

This week on Treasure Island Oldies, Voice Your Choice presents The Fleetwoods, featuring these two Top Ten records for your votes: Mr. Blue and Tragedy. This is going to be a tough decision and I am sure it will be a very close vote outcome.

Come to the Voice Your Choice page and cast your vote for the song you prefer. We'll play the song with the most votes in Hour 3 on the next edition of Treasure Island Oldies.

The Beatles - Song of the Week


The Beatles were masters of interpreting songs recorded first by other artists. A great example is Twist And Shout, originally recorded by and a hit for The Isley Brothers in 1959. A few years later, The Beatles cut their version of it, and it has become a classic. Here it is for you, Twist And Shout by The Beatles, our Song of the Week.

Enjoy!

Sunday, September 07, 2008

This week on Treasure Island Oldies


This week on Treasure Island Oldies
September 7th to September 20th 2008

The Chat Room was packed once again this week, and it was really good to welcome back Sunny in Berkeley, Illinois. She'd been having major computer problems and was unable to join in the regular fun for several weeks. We also wished a big Happy Birthday to Scott Harmon from Phenix City, Alabama. And of course, we played Birthday by The Beatles, the official birthday song of the Island. If you have a birthday coming up, be sure to let me know and I will wish you all the best and play Birthday for you too. Send your email note to michael@treasureislandoldies.com.

On a program note, next week I will be away on vacation and there will be no new live show. However, we are pleased to present an Encore Presentation of our annual Name Game Special. Every song will have someone's name in the song title. It'll be fun and I hope you enjoy this show, originally aired last September 16, 2007. Our next live show will be Sunday, September 21st.

At the Treasure Island Oldies Blog, our Song of the Week is by Bobby Rydell with a pretty rare video clip of him performing Sway. Enjoy!

Voice Your Choice will return with our next live show, Sunday, September 21st.

Great to hear from George in Athens, Greece, who listens to the show via our Broadcast Partner Station, Cruisin' Oldies Radio. Thanks for the nice note, George, and a big thanks to Joey at COR for sending the note to me.

A reminder from UpSNAP that you can now listen to Treasure Island Oldies on your mobile cell phone at no cost. Your carrier airtime minutes and long distance rates apply. All you need to do is call (704) 631-4060. You’ll want to select #1 for Mobile Radio from the main menu and then #9. You will then be prompted to enter the following 4-digit ID code: 1765 for the Archive of the latest show, or 1121 to hear the live show Sunday nights. I've listened to the Archive show and it's cool to hear it via the phone.

Ian Chapman played a terrific song by Darlene Love on this week's feature. Be sure to listen once again in two weeks for another great story and song on Ian Chapman's Girl Groups ONLY on Treasure Island Oldies.

Lots of listeners have signed their name to the Treasure Island Oldies World Map. I invite you to sign the map as well. Just click on the World Map, then fill in your name, city and any comment you'd like to make. You'll join the many listeners who have put themselves on the Treasure Island Oldies World Map. Let the world know you're a proud listener!

If you missed the live show, you can enjoy the Archive of September 7th, 2008, click the Listen button on the Menu.

See you in two weeks. Bye for now.
Michael

Bobby Rydell - Song of the Week


Bobby Rydell is in the spotlight this week in a very old and rare video clip of him performing Sway, our Song of the Week.

Enjoy!
Michael

Wednesday, September 03, 2008

Don LaFontaine - The Voice - Passes



Don LaFontaine, 68; voice of movie trailers
By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
September 3, 2008
Don LaFontaine, the highly sought-after voice-over artist whose sonorous-voiced narration on several thousand movie trailers earned him the title of "The Trailer King," has died. He was 68.

LaFontaine, who also did voice-over work on countless radio and network television promotional spots and commercials, died Monday of complications after treatment for an illness at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, his family said. The illness was not specified.

He was known as "Thunder Throat," "The Voice of God" and "the highest-paid movie-trailer narrator" in Hollywood.

With a rich baritone that was once likened to the sound of someone speaking from the bottom of a well, LaFontaine dramatically narrated the movie trailers for classic films such as "2001: A Space Odyssey" ("A shrieking monolith deliberately buried by an alien intelligence"), "Fatal Attraction" ("A look that led to an evening, a mistake he'd regret all his life") and "The Terminator" ("In the 21st century, a weapon would be invented like no other").

LaFontaine's distinctive voice also was heard on the trailers for "Doctor Zhivago," "MASH," "The Godfather," "Ghostbusters," "Home Alone," "L.A. Confidential," "Independence Day" and nearly 5,000 other movies. He also narrated trailers for the "Indiana Jones," "Rambo" and "Die Hard" series.

"The industry is mourning the loss of a true Hollywood legend," Linda Bell Blue, executive producer of "Entertainment Tonight" and "The Insider," for which LaFontaine was the voice, said in a statement Tuesday.

"Don was not only the reference standard in the voice-over community for his skills, but gave back to all who reached out to him," she said. "Movie trailers and television promos will never be the same."

In a 1995 interview with the San Diego Union-Tribune, LaFontaine said, "People think what I do is just like radio announcing, but it's not."

He viewed himself as a voice actor.

"You want to take the audience out of their seats, out of their homes, out of their complacency and pull them into the story," he said. "You want to make that trailer so compelling that they have to go buy a ticket just to find out how the movie ends."

By the early '90s, LaFontaine was so busy -- he once said he could voice about 60 promotions a week and as many as 35 in a day -- that he was saving time by traveling from job to job in a chauffeur-driven limousine. He later began working from a studio in his home, where he received scripts via fax.

LaFontaine's famously melodramatic movie-trailer voice -- he was most often identified with the introductory phrase, "In a world . . ." -- was ripe for parody and spurred sendups from Pablo Francisco and other comedians.

Despite the public's familiarity with his voice and the occasional interview on the subject of voice-overs, LaFontaine worked in relative anonymity.

But that changed in 2006 when he appeared as "that announcer guy from the movies" in a national car insurance commercial to help a "real" customer, "not an actor," tell her story.

There he was, the casually dressed man with the sandy mustache, standing at a microphone in the woman's kitchen with headphones over his bald head.

Woman, speaking matter-of-factly: "When the storm hit, both our cars were totally underwater."

LaFontaine, with deep-voiced dramatic overtones and accompanied by stirring music: "In a world where both of our cars were totally underwater."

Woman: "We thought it would take forever to get some help."

LaFontaine: "But a new wind was about to blow."

The self-parody, in which he was not only seen but also identified by name, racked up tens of thousands of hits on YouTube, prompting one viewer to write: "Finally, I get to the see who the person is with that voice."

LaFontaine was born Aug. 26, 1940, in Duluth, Minn. After working as a recording engineer in the Army, he became a sound engineer-editor at National Recording Studios in New York City.

In the early '60s, he was assigned to work with radio producer Floyd Peterson, who was creating radio commercials for the movie "Dr. Strangelove." He and Peterson joined forces in a two-man operation and Peterson's quickly expanded company became one of the first to work exclusively in movie advertising.

LaFontaine, who wrote much of the copy, launched his voice-over career unexpectedly after the announcer for a radio-spot presentation for the 1964 movie "Gunfighters of Casa Grande" failed to show and LaFontaine stepped in.

After a number of years as a head of production for Kaleidoscope Films Ltd., a top trailer production house, he launched his own production company, Don LaFontaine Associates, in 1976.

LaFontaine joined Paramount Pictures as head of the studio's trailer department in 1978. After leaving Paramount as a vice president in 1981, he returned to being an independent producer. He then became more heavily involved in doing voice-over work.

"I don't think there will ever be another career quite like mine," he once told Swindle magazine. "It can't be duplicated. I came into the field of movie promos just as it was being born. I had the opportunity to work in virtually every style, mostly reading copy that I had written or co-written. Many of the younger narrators of today grew up hearing me. And right or wrong, it became a sort of template for how trailers should be read."

LaFontaine is survived by his wife, Nita; daughters, Christine, Skye and Elyse; and a grandson.

A private funeral service will be held, and a celebration of LaFontaine's life is pending.

dennis.mclellan@latimes.com

Jerry Reed - Singer Actor Dead At 71


NASHVILLE, Tennessee (AP) -- Jerry Reed, a singer who became a good ol' boy actor in car chase movies like "Smokey and the Bandit," has died of complications from emphysema at 71.

Grammy-winning singer and songwriter Jerry Reed was known for his roles in Burt Reynolds films.

His longtime booking agent, Carrie Moore-Reed, no relation to the star, said Reed died early Monday.

"He's one of the greatest entertainers in the world. That's the way I feel about him," Moore-Reed said.

Reed was a gifted guitarist who later became a songwriter, singer and actor.

As a singer in the 1970s and early 1980s, he had a string of hits that included "Amos Moses," "When You're Hot, You're Hot," "East Bound and Down" and "The Bird."

In the mid-1970s, he began acting in movies such as "Smokey and the Bandit" with Burt Reynolds, usually as a good ol' boy. But he was an ornery heavy in "Gator," directed by Reynolds, and a hateful coach in 1998's "The Waterboy," starring Adam Sandler.

Reynolds gave him a shiny black 1980 Trans Am like the one they used in "Smokey and the Bandit."

Reed and Kris Kristofferson paved the way for Nashville music personalities to make inroads into films. Dolly Parton, Willie Nelson and Kenny Rogers (TV movies) followed their lead.

"I went around the corner to motion pictures," he said in a 1992 AP interview.

Reed had quadruple bypass surgery in June 1999.

Born in Atlanta, Reed learned to play guitar at age 8 when his mother bought him a $2 guitar and showed him how to play a G-chord.

He dropped out of high school to tour with Ernest Tubb and Faron Young.

At 17, he signed his first recording contract, with Capitol Records.

He moved to Nashville in the mid-1960s where he caught the eye of Chet Atkins.

He first established himself as a songwriter. Elvis Presley recorded two of his songs, "U.S. Male" and "Guitar Man" (both in 1968). He also wrote the hit "A Thing Called Love," which was recorded in 1972 by Johnny Cash. He also wrote songs for Brenda Lee, Tom Jones, Dean Martin, Nat King Cole and the Oak Ridge Boys.

Reed was voted instrumentalist of the year in 1970 by the Country Music Association.

He won a Grammy Award for "When You're Hot, You're Hot" in 1971. A year earlier, he shared a Grammy with Chet Atkins for their collaboration, "Me and Jerry." In 1992, Atkins and Reed won a Grammy for "Sneakin' Around."

Reed continued performing on the road into the late 1990s, doing about 80 shows a year.

"I'm proud of the songs, I'm proud of things that I did with Chet (Atkins), I'm proud that I played guitar and was accepted by musicians and guitar players," he told the AP in 1992.

In a 1998 interview with The Tennessean, he admitted that his acting ability was questionable.

"I used to watch people like Richard Burton and Mel Gibson and think, 'I could never do that.'

"When people ask me what my motivation is, I have a simple answer: Money."

Monday, September 01, 2008

This Week on Treasure Island Oldies


This week on Treasure Island Oldies
August 31st to September 6th 2008

Thanks for another fun Labour Day Special and for your requests. Every time I put together a special, it amazes me just how many songs fit into that particular theme. With this week's show, there were plenty of work related songs, lots of school related ones as well, plus a few songs added for the end of summer. And it turned into a blend of great music for four hours.

Our next special will be in two weeks time with The Name Game, an Encore Presentation of this popular special Sunday, September 14th. For our other upcoming special shows, be sure to check out the Schedule. Click Listen on the Menu then Schedules.

Over at the Treasure Island Oldies Blog, our Song of the Week is the fantastic Sam Cooke in a performance of You Send Me. Enjoy!

Voice Your Choice presents Gene Pitney with two of his hit songs for your votes. Do you prefer I Must Be Seeing Things or Last Chance To Turn Around? Cast your vote by clicking the Voice Your Choice button on any page of the website. We'll play the winning song in Hour 3 of next week's show.

Nice to hear from several listeners about the Walker Brothers clip at the Blog a couple of weeks ago, including my longtime friend from my A&M Records days, James Monaco. Sam Ward in Mississauga, Ontario also sent a very nice note. Gordon from Australia emailed saying how much he is enjoying the show as a new listener and commented how he is hearing so many songs that he has not heard in many years. Thanks, Gordon. Angus Macdonald in Portland, Oregon sent a note to say he enjoys listening to the show as well. John Corbett sent in a request to play Report To The Nation by Winkly and Nutly on the Novelty Tune of the Week feature. They were actually Bob Mitchell and Jim Stag, two disc jockeys from KYA in San Francisco. John, be sure to listen to next week's show!

A reminder from UpSNAP that you can now listen to Treasure Island Oldies on your mobile cell phone at no cost. Your carrier airtime minutes and long distance rates apply. All you need to do is call (704) 631-4060. You’ll want to select #1 for Mobile Radio from the main menu and then #9. You will then be prompted to enter the following 4-digit ID code: 1765 for the Archive of the latest show, or 1121 to hear the live show Sunday nights. I've listened to the Archive show and it's cool to hear it via the phone.

Ian Chapman played a rare song by The Dixie Cups on this week's feature. Be sure to listen once again next week for another great story and song on Ian Chapman's Girl Groups ONLY on Treasure Island Oldies.

Lots of listeners have signed their name to the Treasure Island Oldies World Map. I invite you to sign the map as well. Just click on the World Map, then fill in your name, city and any comment you'd like to make. You'll join the many listeners who have put themselves on the Treasure Island Oldies World Map. Let the world know you're a proud listener!

If you missed the live show, you can enjoy the Archive of August 31st, 2008, our Labour Day Special, click the Listen button on the Menu.

Have a good week. Bye for now.
Michael

Gene Pitney - Voice Your Choice


Gene Pitney was born a few days after Valentine's Day, on February 17, 1941 in Hartford, Connecticut and later raised in Rockville, Connecticut. Prior to his own solo career, he recorded with Ginny Arnell as the duo Jamie & Jane in 1959. A year later he was still in disguise as he went by the name of Billy Bryan. Apart from writing songs for himself, he also wrote Hello Mary Lou, recorded by Ricky Nelson, He's A Rebel for The Crystals, and Rubber Ball, which Bobby Vee recorded.

He scored a very impressive twenty four appearances on the Billboard chart, including four Top Ten hits. This week on Treasure Island Oldies, Voice Your Choice features Gene Pitney with two of his great hits: I Must Be Seeing Things and Last Chance To Turn Around. Cast your vote for the song you'd like to hear by coming to the Voice Your Choice page. We'll play the winner in Hour 3 of next week's show.

Sam Cooke - Song of the Week


Sam Cooke is in the spotlight for our Song of the Week with the beautiful You Send Me. Enjoy!
Michael

Monday, August 25, 2008

This week on Treasure Island Oldies


This week on Treasure Island Oldies
August 24th to August 30th 2008


It was so good to be back in the studio for another live show. Despite I only took last week off, it sure seemed like a long time away. As usual, the Chat Room was really busy and buzzing with lots of great conversations and sharing some wonderful musical memories.

On a very sad note, I would like to extend my personal condolences to my friend Matt Meaney from Langley, British Columbia, whose father passed away in California. Matt, all your friends in the Chat Room send their thoughts your way and we all look forward to seeing you and MrsMatt again when you are able.

Next week on the show it's our annual Labour Day Weekend Back To School (and Work) Special. Plus we've got another special all lined up for you, this time it's on Sunday, September 14th with an Encore Presentation of our annual Name Game Special.

Over at the Treasure Island Oldies Blog, our Song of the Week is Love Grows Where My Rosemary Goes by Edison Lighthouse, featuring Tony Burrows on lead vocals. This is a performance from England's Top Of The Pops TV show. Enjoy!

Voice Your Choice spotlights Sir Paul McCartney with two great solo era songs for your votes: Listen To What The Man Said and Let 'Em In. Cast your votes by clicking the Voice Your Choice button on any page of the website and making your selection. We'll play the winning song in Hour 3 of next week's show.

A reminder from UpSNAP that you can now listen to Treasure Island Oldies on your mobile cell phone at no cost. Your carrier airtime minutes and long distance rates apply. All you need to do is call (704) 631-4060. You’ll want to select #1 for Mobile Radio from the main menu and then 9. You will then be prompted to enter the following 4-digit ID code: 1765 for the Archive of the latest show, or 1121 to hear the live show Sunday nights. I've listened to the Archive show and it's cool to hear it via the phone.

Ian Chapman sure surprised me with Connie Francis on this week's feature. Be sure to listen once again next week for another great story and song on Ian Chapman's Girl Groups ONLY on Treasure Island Oldies.

Lots of listeners have signed their name to the Treasure Island Oldies World Map. I invite you to sign the map as well. Just click on the World Map, then fill in your name, city and any comment you'd like to make. You'll join the many listeners who have put themselves on the Treasure Island Oldies World Map. Let the world know you're a proud listener!

If you missed the live show, you can enjoy the Archive of August 24th, 2008, click the Listen button on the Menu.

Have a good week. Bye for now.
Michael

Paul McCartney - Voice Your Choice


This week on Voice Your Choice, Treasure Island Oldies presents Paul McCartney with two of his great solo singles: Listen To What The Man Said and Let 'Em In.

Which song would you like to hear? Cast your vote by coming to the Voice Your Choice Page. Make your selection then wait for the results. We'll play the winning song in Hour 3 of next week's show.

Edison Lighthouse - Song of the Week


Edison Lighthouse
, featuring top lead vocal session singer Tony Burrows, are our feature Song of the Week with Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes) in a performance from the British TV show Top Of The Pops.

Enjoy!

Michael

Tuesday, August 19, 2008

Pervis Jackson of The Spinners Died At Age 70

Pervis Jackson (pictured on far left of photo), who sang bass with The Spinners, has died from cancer at age 70.

Pervis Jackson the bass singer of the Spinners died today of Cancer in a Detroit hospital at the age of 70. Jackson who was an original member of one of Detroit's most well known singing groups.

The Spinners were the greatest soul group of the early '70s, creating a body of work that defined the lush, seductive sound of Philly soul. The groups roots lay in Detroit, where they formed as a doo wop group during the late '50s. Throughout the '60s, the Spinners tried to land a hit by adapting to the shifting fashions of R&B and pop. By the mid-'60s, they had signed with Motown Records, Their primary Motown hit "It's a Shame" became a hit in 1970. The group moved on to create a dynasty of hits such as "Sadie", "Could It Be I'm Falling In Love", and "I'll Be Around", "Love Don't Love Nobody" and other major songs of the 70's.

No funeral arrangements have been given currently, you can find out more at MotownAlumni.com

Visit Motown Alumni Association at:
http://motownalumniassociation.ning.com

Tuesday, August 12, 2008

This week on Treasure Island Oldies

This week on Treasure Island Oldies
Weeks of August 10th to 23rd 2008


What another great show we had again this week , with a lot of requests and a Chat Room full of fun and memories. Speaking of the chat room, there are several listeners and one of the regular "Nuts in the Hut" recently upgraded their Java. The result has been disastrous in that this new version of Java does not work with the Java Applet, one of the two ways to connect; and the other way is via mIRC software. So if you are prompted on your computer screen to upgrade to the latest version of Java, I would say no if you intend to join the Chat Room using the Java Applet. Just a word to the wise.

A program note for next week. I am taking next Sunday, August 17th off, and there will be no live show. However, we are presenting for your enjoyment, an Encore Presentation of our August 17, 2007 show. So the Top Five Countdown and Rock and Roll News will both reflect the correct week. Isn't that clever? lol




On a sad note, I am sorry to say that we lost our beautiful Patches, the Guardian 0f the Treasure Island Oldies Vault. She passed away in her sleep this past Thursday, at the ripe old age of 17 (approximately 85 in human years). She lived a good life and was always loved unconditionally. She will be greatly missed. As a tribute to Patches, I am posting a couple of recent photos. The photo of her looking into my eyes was taken about a week before she died. And although week and frail, she still looked good, as she also did in the other photo from about four weeks ago.
To see an old photo of her in her active role of Guardian of the Vault, click here.



The Treasure Island Oldies Blog this week features postings on the passing of three musicians and artists, the legendary Isaac Hayes, Louis Teicher of Ferrante & Teicher, and Erik Darling from The Tarriers and The Rooftop Singers. In addition, we have our posting for Voice Your Choice, plus the Song of the Week, featuring The Walker Brothers and their second hit song Make It Easy On Yourself. The bonus is Gary Walker is interviewed prior to the guys performing the song. Enjoy!

Please note that there will be no Voice Your Choice this week, due to our Encore Presentation of the August 19, 2007 show next week. This popular feature will return in two weeks. Be sure to visit the website to find out the name of the artist and the songs up for your votes.

I received an email from UpSnap informing me that you can now listen to Treasure Island Oldies on your mobile cell phone at no cost. Your carrier airtime minutes and long distance rates apply. All you need to do is call (704) 631-4060. You’ll want to select #1 for Music from the main menu and then enter a 4-digit ID code. For the latest Archived Show enter 1120 or 1795; for the Live Show enter 1121. Please let me know how this works for you; I'd love to hear from you.

That was a real Lost Treasure from The Chiffons on Ian Chapman's Girl Groups this week. I can't remember when I last heard Stop, Look and Listen. Ian's weekly feature will return in two weeks for our next live show.

Lots of listeners have signed their name to the Treasure Island Oldies World Map. I invite you to sign the map as well. Just click on the World Map, then fill in your name, city and any comment you'd like to make. You'll join the many listeners who have put themselves on the Treasure Island Oldies World Map. Let the world know you're a proud listener!

If you missed the live show, you can enjoy the Archive of August 10th, 2008, click the Listen button on the Menu.

Have a great week; back live in two weeks. Bye for now.

Michael

The Walker Brothers - Song of the Week

Now here is something very cool for this week's video clip, not just a performance, but an interview too. Gary Walker of The Walker Brothers, the trio from Los Angeles who became huge in the UK, is interviewed and then the guys perform their second hit, Make It Easy On Yourself, the Hal David and Burt Bacharach song. And it's our Song of the Week.

Enjoy!
Michael

Monday, August 11, 2008

Legendary Soul Man Isaac Hayes Dead At 65

Very sad news from NME.
Isaac Hayes passed away yesterday (August 10) in Memphis after being found unconscious near a treadmill in his home.

He was 65.

Hayes was discovered by his wife, son and his wife's cousin who returned home from buying groceries to find him on the floor of a downstairs bedroom. After being taken to hospital, Hayes was pronounced dead.

Born August 20, 1942, in Covington, TN, Isaac Hayes was orphaned as a baby and was brought up by his grandparents in a poor rural environment where the family raised their own food.

At 21, Hayes joined the Stax Records family in Memphis and his first paid sessions were as a pianist with Otis Redding in 1964. Going on to work with Booker T And The MGs, The Bar-Kays and Rufus Thomas, Hayes performed as a session musician with a string of acts that created what became known as the Memphis Sound.

His most famous collaboration proved to be 'Soul Man' which he co-wrote for Sam And Dave. The track had been inspired by the African-American Civil Rights Movement and specifically Hayes seeing coverage of the 12 Street Detroit Riot on television. He noted that African-American owned and operated institutions were marked with the word "soul" so that rioters did not destroy them.

He co-wrote the track with his regular song-writing partner David Porter, as "a story about one's struggle to rise above his present conditions. It's almost a tune [where it's] kind of like boasting 'I'm a soul man'. It's a pride thing".

Hayes' 1969 solo album 'Hot Buttered Soul' was groundbreaking. The record put him on the map thanks to his unique style, which introduced new music directions, from his rap-vocals to longer songs.

It was his 1971 album 'Shaft' that shot Hayes to stardom. As the soundtrack to the movie of the same name, the album was the first record by a solo black artist to reach the top of both the R&B and Pop charts, winning an Academy Award for Best Musical Score and landing three Grammy Awards and a Golden Globe. The album stayed in the charts for 16 months.

In addition to his music, Hayes forged a successful career as an actor, with roles in over 30 movies including 'Robin Hood: Men In Tights', 'It Could Happen To You' and 'Reindeer Games'.

His TV career also flourished as the voice of Nickelodeon's 'Nick At Nite' and acting roles in 'The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air', 'Sliders', 'Tales From The Crypt' and 'Girlfriends'.

In 1997 he landed the voice of Chef on animated TV show 'South Park', voicing the popular character from the show's inception until 2006. In character, he scored a UK Number single in 1999 with 'Chocolate Salty Balls (PS I Love You)'.

Hayes left the show acrimoniously after reportedly being unhappy with an episode which criticised his religion Scientology, with the star reportedly saying at the time "There is a place in this world for satire, but there is a time when satire ends and intolerance and bigotry towards religious beliefs of others begins."

However with Hayes suffering a stroke just before his departure from the show, there was some question whether he could have been capable of making such a statement, or the decision by himself.

Inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2002, Hayes's music has been sampled in over 200 songs by the likes of Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Destiny's Child, Tricky, Portishead and Notorious BIG.

Hayes was married four times and had 12 children. He is survived by his wife Adjowa.